Chrome for Windows will throttle individual background tabs to improve battery life

  • Chrome for Windows will throttle individual background tabs to improve battery life

Chrome for Windows will throttle individual background tabs to improve battery life

The latest update for Google Chrome has tried to fix the issue by throttling the background tabs. All those background tabs can have a major impact on your device's power usage and battery life. Under its new throttling policy, Chrome will delay those timers to limit average CPU load to as little as 1 percent of a core if too much power is being consumed.

Despite the self-imposed limitations on throttling, Timins says the changes lead to "25% fewer busy background tabs".

The new update comes after Microsoft uncovered evidence that Chrome was found to drain laptop batteries. According to the announcement post that Google wrote about the changes, this is important in order to increase the efficiency of browsing the web. That's partially due to your background tabs - tabs that are open but aren't being actively used. Although the new policy applies to all tabs, sites can continue to run code in the background with full performance if they use modern mechanisms to request CPU time. After a tab has been in the background for 10 seconds, the tab will be subject to limitations based on its CPU usage.

Google originally planned to throttle background tabs as early as Chrome 56, according to Android Police, but because of concerns that it would break a large amount of web pages, it was stashed on the back burner.

Here's how it works: Each background tab is given a time budget for running processes in the background.

Chrome 57 has started rolling out to Chrome users or you can download it manually from the Chrome website.

Google Chrome 57 update officially introduces background tab throttling.

Furthermore, as expected, Chrome 57 for iOS is also now rolling out and version 57.0.2987.100 brings along the rumoured Read Later feature - just like the one in Safari.

I'm curious why Google is going after this functionality given that it has ignored other features that built into competing browsers.

Here's how Chrome's new throttling system works.